Use plasma-rich platelets (PRP) in hair transplantation

Use plasma-rich platelets (PRP) in hair transplantation

Plasma-rich platelets (PRP)
Men and women who think about hair transplantation are always looking at the Internet. The results of online research on “hair transplantation” may refer to related terms, such as platelet plasma, or abbreviation (PRP), which is described as a procedure that promotes recovery and hair growth after hair transplantation. Many referrals for plasma-rich plasma (PRP) can be found in sports medicine to treat injury. Some online articles also make exaggerated claims about PRP plasma.
How to use PRP plasma in hair transplantation? What is its purpose?

Does PRP actually contribute to recovery and better hair growth after implant surgery?
Hair transplants are often performed in one extended session, or multiple sessions over several weeks or months. However, the expanded session includes the entire process – the transfer of hair follicles from the donor area in the back of the patient’s scalp and the placement of these follicles in the area transferred to the scalp; in one session lasting several hours. Prolonged treatment for several sessions may be a better option, and this is left to the patient’s wishes and other factors, such as the medical condition.
Over the next three to six months, most of the cultivated bulbs grow to produce hair in the plant area, but some bulbs do not grow in their new environment. This has led to the search for a way to enhance the survival of cultivated seedlings and increase the results of treatment with minimal scars after cultivation, Experiments using PRP plasma. Research and literature on the use of PRP plasma in sports medicine, orthopedic surgery, dentistry and other medical and surgical specialties are increasing to promote tissue recovery and postoperative recovery or injury.
An optimal survey of questions about plasma PRP begins with a view of platelets, the plasma-rich axis of platelets.
What are platelets?
Platelets are biological components of the blood, and red and white blood cells are added. Unlike these cells, the platelets do not have a nucleus, so they are not classified as cells. They are also somewhat smaller than white and red blood cells.
Platelets are therefore components of the blood clotting system. When the injury leads to vasculature and hemorrhage, the platelets then activate rapidly and contribute to the formation of a blood clot. Therefore, blood platelets contribute to clot formation through
(1) involved in the secretion of the sequence of the basic chemical factors of the clot formation process.
(2) change shape and cohesion with each other to restrain hemorrhage through a physical barrier to flow (thrombosis). This physical barrier consists of corrugated sheets and strings of fiber known as “fibrous”.
Platelets are more than just first responders to hemorrhagic injury. Each blood plate is a chemical biochemical store of specific regulated molecules that include growth factors that contribute to tissue recovery and treatment; and an emergency response from the body to infections. The platelet growth factor molecules include:
The growth factor derived from the platelet (PDGF short) – which is responsible for promoting vascular growth, cell regeneration and skin formation.
(TGF-b), which is responsible for promoting cell growth between cells and bone metabolism.
Growth Factor for Vascular Endothelium (VEGF Abbreviation) – It is responsible for promoting vascular build-up.
Human Growth Factor (EGF) – It is responsible for promoting cell growth and differentiation, vascular formation, and collagen formation.
Fiber Growth Factor 2 (FGF-2) – which is responsible for promoting specialized cell growth and vascular building.
The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) – a regular function regulator in almost all types of body cells.
All of the growth factors mentioned above are responsible for initiating and strengthening physiological processes that contribute to tissue recovery and healing. In addition, growth factors are also involved in normal physiological processes such as vascular building.
Therefore, the reason for the use of PRP plasma in surgery is to increase the number of platelets artificially in a position where the store of growth factors in platelets can be used to promote tissue recovery and repair and promote health.
What is PRP?
PRP is a blood plasma that contains a concentration in platelets at a rate that is more than normal in the blood. PRP is characterized as “self”, that is, it comes from the person’s own body. This is similar to a patient’s blood donation before surgery for postoperative use rather than a blood bank if a blood transfusion is needed. Another example is the removal and transfer of the patient’s skin from one location to another for surgery. Because PRP plasma is subjective, it is unlikely to cause an immune reaction caused by being a strange object on the patient. And PRP plasma neutral in terms of immune effect.
PRP Plasma in Sports Medicine
PRP Plasma has gained an increasing interest in sports medicine because it is used in the treatment of muscle, bone and joint injuries by skilled professional athletes. Sports stars treated with PRP include Pittsburgh Steelers, Heinz Ward, Los Angeles Dodgers, Takashi Saito and New York Mets, Jose Rice. The credit attributed to the PRP plasma in the speed of recovery of these stars from injury without the need for surgery.
With the expanded use of PRP in sports, this has been accompanied by an increase in warnings of the accepted acceptance of PRP as a “magic cure”; while the positive